Princess Kaguya: The film that called back my heart

Princess Kaguya is not another eco-wake-up-call disguised as a film. It’s infinitely more.
Princess Kaguya Woods

 

Don’t get me wrong, I love a punch in the gut epic about the human race’s struggle for survival on a planet that barely supports life. But I’d much prefer a tale about our species yearning to reconnect with a nature that is ready and willing to assist us.

Where “The inconvenient Truth’s” statistical sensibility made me realize the urgency of our ability as humans to be “proactive” about our planet. Mad Max gave me goosebumps with how fetishized our culture has become. Princess Kaguya goes straight to the heart of the matter, through the best way to make an impact. Through our heart. This may be a retelling of a thousand-year-old Japanese folktale, but director Isao Takahata has brought it to life in a way that feels full of freshness.

Princess Kaguya Spring

The film contains many landmarks that are recognizably Ghibli. A young, curious, courageous female protagonist, who as the film develops is more complex than she is cute. I’m a bit bias when it comes to animation (having studied 2D traditional animation,) but the visuals of Princess Kaguya are stunning. Hand painted backgrounds are typical for Ghibli, but every scene here is masterfully subtle. The colored pencil outlines are also a welcome touch. And the colors are sheer genius.

When it comes to the audio, I always prefer subtitles and original voices, over any kind of dubbing. But here I was pleasantly surprised by the top notch voice casting of the dubbed version (especially Kaguya played by Chloë Grace Moretz.)

Conclusion: Princess Kaguya is a landmark of animation that reshapes notions of what’s important in life. It’s the most emotionally rich film I’ve seen in years, and with today’s epic-technology-laden-films it stands out like a bamboo shoot in winter. Sure we can create dystopian worlds, sexy complicated tech, crazy levels of gore, or even recreate a long-extinct species. But after the wow-factor has worn it’s welcome, I emerge from the experience asking, what’s the point? It’s the stories we connect with that we’ll cherish, we’ll remember, and will enrich our lives.

Princess Kaguya Boar Piglets

Princess Kaguya is a masterpiece of visual storytelling that I’ll be thinking about, dreaming about, and re-watching with friends, children, and my children soon. Life ebbs and flows, and the stories we remember are the one’s that bring us together. So next time I find myself gazing at mother moon. I’ll thank her for bringing light to our nights, and solace to our fruitful days.

“Be present, stay still, and keep open.”

© Morehead Media, 2015.

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The Free Radicals Revolution

What is a Free Radical? 

Radical comes from the Latin word “radix” meaning “root.”

Free means not under the control of another.

Scientifically speaking  a free radical is an atom that has an unpaired electron. Which makes them reactive to any chemical reaction. Which is great for combustion’s.

Confused? I know I was, until I realized that I was that rogue electron. I was the lonely

That’s why I’m suggesting a revolution. A Free Radicals Revolution. A new frontier for education through methods that are inspiring, uplifting and altogether radical. Using the modern media outlets and the mass movement of online interaction, I propose a project that’s as accessible as it is entertaining. But not just entertaining, empowering.

Teaching techniques for holistic well being masquerading as a  comic. Comic in the sense of sequential storytelling. The same one’s you read at the grocery store check-out while your mom tried to decide between the Soy milk or Almond milk.

I’ve been a “healer” my entire life, yet I would have shot anyone a dirty look for calling me this. The term conjured up a dystopian shaman, living in a mud hut miles away from civilization, wearing a cryptic amulet, chanting and praying for rain. I’ve met many who followed this stereotype to the T. But little did I know “healer,” was a restorer of balance.

And balance was something I’d been searching for my entire life. I was born and raised within the transcendental Meditation movement. Founded in the 70’s by a gregarious guru who invited thousands of spiritual seekers if they would be willing to give up everything and relocate to Iowa. My parents were 2 of those who made the migration.

For reasons I won’t go into here, I am both grateful, and perturbed. Yet despite the endless hours of meditating, keeping a diligent routine, and learning Sansrkit, which I wouldn’t trade for anything I wasn’t compete.

It takes a village to raise a child,” yet my village was so isolated, I often wondered if there was a world beyond the corn fields. If the same routine, jokes, ideas, obsessions, fears and stories of the glory days (The TM Movements uprising) weren’t claustrophobic enough, the education was cabin fever.

I am an artist. Like many artists I fought against the grain of grades, homework, and conflicting sexual identity. Since my teachers considered my art as a side project, I treated their classes extra-curricular at best. My entire primary education was in the margins of my notebooks.  Even my recreation felt like borrowed time from my imagination.

I drew between classes, at sports events and even during dinner. The real question that grew during my creative process was,

What’s the point?

Of my art? Of my life? More than, respect, fame..

Thus began my mission in life. How to make art with purpose.

Over my 10+ years of wellness practices, (Transcendental Meditation & Nishpatti Yoga. Chi-Kung & Chinese Energetics. Kolaimni to the Empowerment Process) I’ve experienced countless transformations and even more realizations that no matter how many techniques I learn, I’m still a storyteller at heart. Through Vedanta philosophy, story structure, an assorted art education and a passion for conscious content, I founded ©Morehead Media, “Enriching lives one breath and line at a time.”

With the founding of Morehead Media I finally realized the purpose of my mission. “Suffering is not necessary to create.” Or in other words “art is a tool to create your incredible life.”

Stories teach. We’ve been doing it since the dawn of humanity. It’s your ability to tell a story that allows you to leave behind your legacy. The old and new worlds can be bridged, friends made, facts remembered, and spirits uplifted by telling stories. If art, science & magic had a baby it would be called a story. History is the Grandmother of this little story, and she can weave a tale that could stop father time in his tracks.

Once I discovered this magical-storytelling-formula, I realized I was never alone. I could invite others along for the ride. I had a story that would grow in length, and as it grew so would my listeners. The story I want to tell you is true. As sure as the hair on my face.

The Free Radicals is a tale about a revolution that has happened before and is happening now. It’s about the triumphs and tragedies of growing up. This story begins with you.

Are you ready to join the Free Radicals Revolution? Click below to find out how!

http://www.freeradicalsrevolution.com/connect/

“Humanity thinks in metaphors and learns through stories.” –Mary Catherine Bateson

Paul James Morehead Jr. –Creative Director, ©Morehead Media (2012)